Saturday 3 November 2012

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(Photo: The Battle of Cannae (/ˈkæni/ or /ˈkæn/) was a major battle of the Second Punic War, which took place on August 2, 216 BC near the town of Cannaein Apulia in southeast Italy. The army of Carthage under Hannibal decisively defeated a numerically superior army of the Roman Republic under command of the consuls Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro. It is regarded as one of the greatest tactical feats in military history and, in numbers killed, the second greatest defeat of Rome (second to the Battle of Arausio).)

 

JOHN BATCHELOR SHOW

Pharsalus: Greek town in Thessaly, well-known for the famous battle in 48 BCE in which the Roman general Julius Caesar defeated his opponent Pompey the Great. This was the end of the Roman republic

Saturday 905P Eastern Time:   Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss, 1 of 4

Saturday 920P Eastern Time:   Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss; 2 of 4

Saturday 935P Eastern Time:  Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss; 3 of 4

Saturday 950P Eastern Time:   Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss; 4 of 4

 

Bezeklik Grottoes in the Flaming Mountains near Turfan hang precariously off a cliff above a steep gorge. However, the Buddhist carvings and murals within these caves were not sufficiently remote to escape both the onslaught of Islam and the intentions of foreign archaeologists and treasure seekers.

Saturday 1005P (705P Pacific):  Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present by Christopher I. Beckwith; 1 of 4

Saturday 1020P (720P Pacific):  Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present by Christopher I. Beckwith; 2 of 4

Saturday 1035P (735P Pacific):  Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present by Christopher I. Beckwith; 3 of 4

Saturday 1050P (750P Pacific):  Empires of the Silk Road: A History of Central Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the Present by Christopher I. Beckwith; 4 of 4

Saturday 1105P (805P Pacific):   The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt by Toby A. H. Wilkinson; 1 of 4

Saturday 1120P (820P Pacific):  The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt by Toby A. H. Wilkinson; 2 of 4

Saturday 1135P (835P Pacific):   The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt by Toby A. H. Wilkinson; 3 of 4

“…a magnificent discovery inside the Great Pyramid of "graffiti" said to "be ancient graffiti tags left by a worker or symbols of religious significance."   "A robot with a camera went down a mysterious passage only eight inches wide and found some hieroglyphs daubed with red paint onto the floor of a secret chamber at the end of the tunnel.  Egyptologist Luca Miatello has deciphered the writing and says they're engineering marks. They make the number 121, which corresponds to the length in cubits of the so-called Queen's Chamber of the pyramid.”

Saturday 1150P (850P Pacific):  The Rise and Fall of Ancient Egypt by Toby A. H. Wilkinson; 4 of 4

Saturday/Sun 1205A (905 Pacific):  Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss, 1 of 4

Saturday/Sun 1220A (920 Pacific):   Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss, 2 of 4

Saturday/Sun 1235A (935P Pacific): Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss, 3 of 4

Saturday/Sun 1250A  (950P Pacific): Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar, and the Genius of Leadership by Barry Strauss, 4 of 4

 

 

Photo, above: Karakoram Highway.  New satellite data show that the glaciers in the Karakoram have grown slightly over the last decade, bucking the global trend. The Karakoram, adjacent to the Himalayas, includes K2, the second tallest mountain in the world. While the Karakoram is home to many of the world's glaciers, there is little data on their behavior because it is so remote.

New studies of satellite data from from 1999 and 2008 by Julie Gardelle of the University of Grenoble in France and colleagues show that the glaciers grew slightly, adding an extra layer of ice that equates to an 11-centimetre thickness of water every year. By taking up this extra water, the glaciers prevented about 0.01 millimetres of sea level rise per year.

The Daily Galaxy via newscientist.com and grenoble-univ.fr